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Trigger control is one of the most important aspects of firearm control. In it’s simplest form, trigger control means keeping your finger off the trigger until you are ready to fire the firearm, one of the Three golden Rules of firearm safety. Just as important is the way one “presses” the trigger.

Pistol Shooting Tips

Pistol Shooting TipsTrigger control is one of the most important aspects of firearm control. In it’s simplest form, trigger control means keeping your finger off the trigger until you are ready to fire the firearm, one of the Three golden Rules of firearm safety. Just as important is the way one “presses” the trigger. It is common even among seasoned shooters to hear them use the term “pull” the trigger. Pulling the trigger in it’s literal translation implies that the trigger finger grasps the trigger and with a squeezing motion of the hand , pulls the trigger into the palm of the hand. as is shown in the video, pulling the trigger causes a natural rotation to the right in the hand of a right handed shooter. As the distance grows between the shooter and their target, the distance the bullet impacts to the left of center grows. For instance, if I “pull” the trigger on a target that is 10 feet away, the point of impact may be 2″ off center. “pulling” the trigger on the same target at 20 feet away may cause the point of impact to move left to the point that the target is completely missed. This “pull” is easily identified on the Shooters Wheel as points of impact to the left of center target. Perfect Press Wheel To correct this problem the fundamentals of the “Perfect Press” must be mastered. It starts with training the trigger finger topress flat on the trigger rather than pull on it. This can be a bit trickier than you might expect. I know that I spent many hours training my trigger finger to bend flat at the middle knuckle without curling. You may think that sounds a bit perplexing, but my line of work requires that my hands constantly grasp tools tightly, resulting in a curling of my fingers as natural muscle memory. To bend my trigger finger only at the middle knuckle, leaving the remainder of my finger straight was as foreign to me as wearing a skirt. I have worked and trained to teach my trigger finger to work properly, but as of the writing of this article have spent no time working on the skirt thing….. My training began with physically holding the lower portion of my trigger finger still with my left hand while bending the upper portion at the middle knuckle to a 90 degree position. This portion of my training took many hours until I could freely raise my hand and bend my trigger finger properly without assistance of my left hand as an anchor. Bullseye Once I had practiced and trained my trigger finger into performing the proper movement I moved onto being able to “Press” or exert force straight backwards on the trigger without curling the end of my finger. Once I mastered this motion it was time to putthe whole thing into dry practice with a firearm. If you think that it’s all gravy from there, you will find that your body will always try and revert to its first state and cause you to periodically shoot left….the true litmus test of trigger control. To this day I practice this motion with my trigger finger every day while I go about my day. If you think it’s easy, once you have mastered this simple movement, ask some of your non shooter friends to mimic the movement you show them with your trigger finger. In my unscientific trials, 95% of people asked cannot make their finger work that way without holding the base of their finger with the opposing hand. Once you’ve mastered the “press” with your trigger finger and forced the proper movement into your muscle memory, you can move on to all of the other “demons” that affect your shooting. Without building the “Perfect Press” foundation your efficiency and accuracy with your firearm will never be consistent.

[Guide] How to Buy a Gun from the CMP?

[Guide] How to Buy a Gun from the CMP?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s You may have heard about the Civilian Marksmanship Program, the organization through which you can purchase sought after surplus military firearms, like M1911s and M1 Garands. Want one of these babies? You’re gonna wanna go through the CMP. But even if you have, you may be less than clear about how to go about actually purchasing the firearm. But don’t worry–that’s what I’m here for, and this guide will tell you everything you need to know. CMP Logo I’ll cover what’s required for eligibility to purchase from the CMP, then talk about the different avenues you have for buying M1911s and rifles from them. Throughout, I’ll also link you to places on the CMP site where you can find out more and access the paperwork that you need. Table of Contents Loading... What Is the CMP? But first, let’s talk a little bit about the CMP and why they handle these sales. The "Civilian Marksmanship Program" , or CMP, was started in 1903 by the United States Congress under the War Department Appropriations Act in order to encourage and provide opportunities for civilians to learn marksmanship and practice their skills with military-style firearms. WWI American Doughboys with M1911s The idea was that if the US had to go to war, we’d have a population that was already skilled with the firearms used by the US Armed Forces and was ready to serve with less need for training. The CMP: Turning Americans from Fudds to badasses since 1903! This was especially important since the military had just adopted the bolt-action M1903 Springfield, but most of the population was only familiar with lever-action rifles, not bolt-action ones. While the CMP started out as marksmanship training for adults, it has since shifted its focus primarily to youth and safe, responsible use of firearms. In addition, while the CMP was started by the US government and managed by the US Army until 1996, since then it has been managed by the Corporation for the Promotion of Rifle Practice & Firearms Safety, which was also started by the US government but runs independently as a non-profit that receives no federal funding unless you count the surplus firearms the CPRPFS receives from the Army. Phew! They just don’t make propaganda the way they used to! These days, the CMP primarily deals with training classes, competitions, and, yes, sales of surplus firearms. But how do you get your hands on one of these firearms? Well, first you have to make sure that you’re eligible to buy one. Eligibility Not just anyone can buy from the CMP, but the eligibility requirements aren’t anything too extreme, and most of us will even have the paperwork proving that we meet the first few requirements already on hand. In addition, the process is also streamlined for repeat customers , so you won’t have to prove all of this every time you order. It’s not that hard, we promise! In order to purchase from the CMP, you need to be able to prove that you are: Legally Able to Purchase a Firearm First, you obviously need to be able to legally own and purchase a firearm . You’ll just have to fill out the paperwork for an FBI background check like you would buying a gun from any store and if your state requires a license or permit before you possess a firearm, you’ll need to include a copy of it in your order paperwork. Can’t buy a pew pew when you’re in the pokey. Some states will also have requirements for where your firearm can be shipped, so you’ll need to provide the appropriate paperwork for the dealer to which it will be shipped or showing that it can be shipped to your home. A Citizen of the United States Second, you must be a U.S. citizen and be able to prove it. All I wanted to know is if you wanted to grab dinner… Proof can be a U.S. birth certificate, passport, enhanced driver’s license (not your standard driver’s license and only available in a few states), certificate of naturalization, or another official government-issued document that shows US citizenship or that you were born in the United States (military IDs must show a rank of E5 or higher). At Least 18 Years Old (or 21 for M1911 Purchases) Third, you have to be able to prove that you’re at least 18 years old for rifle purchases and 21 years old for M1911 purchases . Most proof of citizenship will also count for this, but if not, your standard driver’s license or government issued ID will do. Okay, but do you have ID? These last couple requirements are the ones that fewer of us will have already met, but they’re still not too difficult to take care of. It’s worth noting that some states, like California, require you to be 21 years old to purchase rifles. Know your local laws. A Member of a CMP Affiliated Club or Organization You need a current membership card or other proof of membership for a CMP affiliated organization . If you’re not already part of one, you can find a CMP affiliated club using the CMP’s Club Search tool. Joining a club is usually around $25 or less. Yes… that is how club membership works… If you are, but your organization doesn’t provide membership cards, you can just have the club fill out the CMP Club Member Certification Form for you and then you can turn it in with the rest of your paperwork for the order. However, in addition to shooting clubs, the CMP also counts professional 501(c)3 law enforcement organizations, US Military service (including the National Guard, reserves, and retirees), membership in congressionally chartered veterans’ organizations like the American Legion or Veterans of Foreign Wars, and the Garand Collector’s Association for this requirement. Yes, Judge Dredd. That counts. Also, you don’t have to be part of a CMP affiliate organization to buy instructional materials or CMP merch, but you do in order to buy the good stuff like firearms, parts, and ammo. Aware of Safe Range Procedure and Safe Firearm Handling Finally, you’ll need to show proof that you know range procedure and how to safely handle a firearm . That includes documentation of one of the following: Current or former military service, Current or former law enforcement service, Participation in a shooting competition using rifles, pistols, shotguns, or air guns (documented in the form of a copy of the results bulletin), The completion of a marksmanship clinic with live fire training or hunting safety course with live firing training (documented by letter from the instructor or a copy of the certificate of completion), A concealed carry license, An FFL or Curios and Relics License, Distinguished, Instructor, or Coach status, A CMP Marksmanship Form completed by a law enforcement officer or club or range official observing your shooting. As long as you’re safe, boo. However, if you’re over 60 years old, you’re exempt from this requirement. If you don’t have documentation on hand, it’s pretty easy to get the Marksmanship Form filled out at your local range, but if you don’t have one or have some sort of deep-seated vendetta against the range staff, you can find a CMP approved club, clinic, or competition using the CMP Club & Competition Tracker . Probably not going to win over any RSO’s like this but…. you can try? Alternatively, it’s never a bad time to go ahead and get your carry license. Once you have everything you need to prove that you meet all the above requirements, you’ll just attach it to the order packet when you order your firearm! For more information on eligibility, you can check out the Eligibility Requirements page on the CMP website. Buying a Rifle The CMP’s sales program is perhaps best known for selling M1 Garands, but they also sell M1 Carbines, M1917 Enfields, and various air guns. A Colourised Shot of an Indian Rifleman Shooting a Lee-Enfield Rifle During World War II They sell both air rifles and air pistols, but the air pistols fall under the same rules as the rifles, so know that I’m talking about air pistols, too, when I say “rifles” in this section. You have a few different options for buying a rifle from the CMP. Mail Ordering a Rifle from the CMP The most accessible option for most of us is buying through mail order. Just send an order form and all of your proof of eligibility to: Civilian Marksmanship Program Attn: Sales 1401 Commerce Blvd . Anniston, AL 36207 The order form includes instructions to make sure you’ve filled it out properly and got all of your paperwork in order. Daffy Mail The CMP’s rifle sales are exempt from federal laws requiring that firearms are shipped to an FFL holder, so you can just have it delivered to your house, unless your state has additional laws about where firearms can be shipped. Brick & Mortar CMP Stores Alternatively, if you happen to live near Anniston, Alabama or Port Clinton, Ohio, or else are willing to travel to either city, you can purchase a rifle at one of the two CMP stores . The CMP North Store in Ohio This isn’t dissimilar from buying at a regular brick and mortar gun shop in one of those two states, but remember that ff you live somewhere that requires a license or permit for purchase, you’ll need to show it, and if you buy at the store, but want to have the rifle shipped back home, you’ll still be exempt from federal FFL requirements, but not state ones. CMP Auctions The CMP also has an auction site where they list their rarer or more unusual firearms, as well as parts, accessories, and more. If you’re looking for something a little bit different, the CMP auction is a great place to find it. CMP Warehouse Buying an M1911 The process for buying a 1911 from the CMP is different from (and much less straightforward than) the process for buying rifles since it’s governed by different laws and technically handled by a separate entity, M1911. United States Marine Uses Colt M1911 There has only been one round of 1911 sales so far, selling 8,000 1911s transferred to the CMP in early 2018. However, the CMP received 19,000 sales packets from interested buyers, even with a limit of one per customer. Real footage of the CMP office dealing with all those sales packets. That’s a lot of packets to process, including ensuring that each one is from an eligible buyer, that each one is complete, and that there aren’t multiple packets from the same person trying to improve their chances of getting an M1911 (you know who you are, shame on you)–and CMP 1911 isn’t exactly a massive organization with tons of people to handle all of that. CMP 1911 On top of that, each packet requires more work than an order for a CMP rifle, since the law requires an additional NICS background check for 1911 purchases to ensure that the buyer can legally own a 1911-style gun and 1911 sales are not eligible for the FFL shipping exception that applies to the CMP’s rifle sales. In addition, CMP 1911 is separate from regular CMP sales, so each customer had to be treated as a new one, with no records from previous CMP sales to simplify and streamline the process. Hmmm, who gets a 1911 today? And, since the demand exceeded the supply by so much, the CMP conducted a lottery to determine who would get a 1911, but it took several months to get those numbers distributed. When 1911 sales began, the idea was that additional 1911s could be transferred to the CMP each year (but never more than 10,000 in a single fiscal year), but it doesn’t appear that the CMP received any in 2019. That’s probably for the best, so they can finish dealing with the sales from 2018. On the other hand, it would be nice to know when the next opportunity to buy a surplus M1911 will be. M1911 with holster and mag pouch Between the backlog of orders making it unclear when the CMP will sell new 1911s and the fact that the CMP’s 1911 sales information webpage is unfortunately pretty confusing, the best way to stay on top of what you need to do when is to sign up for the CMP’s sales updates email newsletter . Fortunately, things seem to be calming down and pistols have been shipping out since around the middle of 2019, so hopefully, CMP 1911 will be selling more pistols this year. C’moooonnnnnn! And, while the CMP’s auction site mostly carries rifles, parts, and accessories, some 1911s described as “rare, odd, special, commercial pistols” did go onto the auction site during the first round of sales, so it’s worth keeping an eye out for one if you don’t luck out in the lottery next go around. Other Ways to Buy If you’re just looking for parts, ammo, and other items, but not firearms, you have a few more options. CMP Online Store The CMP EStore sells parts, tools, targets, ammo, equipment, various CMP merch, and more. Again, the only way to buy complete firearms online from the CMP is through the auction site. By Phone If you’ve purchased from the CMP before and have therefore already proven eligibility, you can order certain things, including ammo and parts, by phone. But like, who actually talks on the phone anymore?! If ordering by phone, you have to pay with a credit card. You can call Monday through Friday between 9am and 2pm CST. The number is 256-835-8455. By Fax If it’s still 1980 wherever you live, you can also order via fax by sending your paperwork, including phone and fax numbers, to 256-831-8331. Get with the times, yo. A Few More Things to Know That about wraps things up on buying from the Civilian Marksmanship Program, but there are a few final things that you should know before ordering. First, the condition of CMP guns is frequently not great. After all, many of these firearms have actually seen service, and there’s a reason the military doesn’t want to hold on to them. If you’ve been in, you know. Most of these firearms, including the M1911 and M1 Garand, are available at a few different grades, or levels, of condition at different prices. Obviously, the better the condition, the higher the price. Make sure to choose the right grade on your paperwork to avoid being charged more than you expected or getting a gun that’s in worse condition than you wanted. They don’t–but they do take a check! Similarly, if you pay with a cashier’s check, money order, or personal check (the CMP also takes Visa, Mastercard, American Express, and Discover cards), make sure you’re also including the cost of shipping. Shipping rates can be found on the CMP’s Ordering Information page, linked below. In addition, you should also be aware that some firearms have limits on the number that can be bought per year. No, John. Not lots of guns. For example, we already covered that M1911s were limited to one per purchaser and M1 Garands are limited to eight per person per calendar year with sales of M1 Garand receivers counting towards that total. Finally, you’ll want to check out the CMP website’s Ordering Information and Sales FAQ pages for a rundown of your purchasing options and more information about what to expect during the purchase and delivery process, straight from the horse’s mouth. Are you planning to order from the CMP? Do you have any questions about how to navigate the process? Have you ordered from the CMP before? If so, do you have any tips for making it as smooth as possible? You might also like the Best Historical Guns You Can Still Buy !

IV8888 Range Day [2019]: Our Favorite Guns

IV8888 Range Day [2019]: Our Favorite Guns

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Chances are, you’re probably familiar with Iraq Veteran8888 . IV8888 and his awesome AK-47 Meltdown! With close to 2.5 million subs, he’s a bit of a powerhouse in the guntube community – putting out historical firearm content and sometimes firing guns until they literally destroy themselves multiple times a week. What you probably didn ‘t know is that he also hosts one hell of an industry party – and we were lucky enough to receive an invite! What is Range Day? IV8888’s range day has become something of a Mecca for content creators. It’s a great chance to meet and greet with folks who run channels both large and small – if you can manage to hold a conversation over the nearly non-stop full auto mag dumps. Bearded Man Overlooking Vista in Desert With little idea what I was getting myself into, I flew my West Coast, avocado toast devouring self all the way out to beautiful Blakely, Georgia – completely unaware of the tropical storm that was preparing to turn Arena Training Facility into a muddy, soupy mess. Trail runners were not an ideal choice of footwear. Oops. Alas! Thanks to the support of a handful of manufacturers and individuals alike, the IV8888 Range Day includes a ton of machine guns. Sounds like a good time, yeah? We’ve got a rundown on our favorite gatpieces from the celebration below! Best Guns From IV8888 2019 Range Day 1. CMMG Mutant While 7.62×39 AR hybrid platforms that take AK mags aren’t new – it’s not every day that you get a chance to run a mag through a full auto, SBR variant like this CMMG Mutant . Good lord this thing is loud. 7.62×39 out of a 10-something inch barrel is pretty damn punishing to be around, and it was incredibly obvious when the Mutant was throwing lead downrange, no matter where in the facility you were. But also: HELL YEAH 😎 We’re told that this is the same Mutant that CMMG has been taking to shows all over the country for the past year or two – with an estimated round count somewhere north of 100k at this point. It’s also only had minimal upkeep and repairs performed during that time period, and although it broke a firing pin during the IV8888 event, it continued fire with occasional failures to feed before CMMG had realized what happened. Bursts of full-auto Soviet intermediate cartridges is a hell of a way to start your dreary day, but we’re certainly not complaining. The Mutant is, well, a beast. 2. OSS’ Suppressed AK-104ish Thing While we didn’t catch what exact AK build OSS Suppressors was using to demonstrate the baffleless design of their cans, it’s got a carbine-style front end and a triangle side-folding stock similar to those found on the AK-74 series of rifles, although this particular bad boy was chambered in 7.62×39. So it’s… kind of an AK-104. Sorta. Alas! The gun isn’t so much the important part here, compared to the absolute joy that shooting the gun suppressed produces. As is briefly discussed in the video, OSS’ suppressors utilize a unique design that not only captures escaping gas, but gas that would eventually wind up being spewed out of the ejection port (and into your eyes) as well. AK’s are gassy guns in general anyway, and suppressing them only exacerbates the issue. However, the OSS can definitely does its job and saves your eyes from that fun, stinging watery sensation that occasionally comes from suppressed rifles. In short, HELL YEAH 😎 3. OSS Suppressed H&K G28 Another rad piece from the OSS booth – the H&K G28! It’s not often that us plebs get a chance to handle any of HK’s signature mustard yellow bangsticks, but the experience was an awesome one. The G28 is the US Army’s new designated marksman rifle, and after some budgetary concerns that plagued the CSASS program that spawned the rifle, it appears to be set to replace the older Knights Armament M110s. Notably, the Army’s contract includes an OSS suppressor as part of the package! As a bit of a small arms nerd, it’s pretty damn neat to be able to get some rounds off through what’s about to be an issued rifle. The G28 is a damn smooth shooter, and I found myself wishing we had the opportunity to really stretch the rifle’s legs out on the 1,000 yard range just up the hill. Considering that my last experience with anything chambered in 7.62×51 NATO was during our review of Springfield’s M1As, the G28 left me with a resounding, inner feeling of: HELL YEAH 😎 4. Select Fire DSA SA58 / FAL The FAL is one of the world’s first battle rifles chambered in 7.62×51 NATO, and has seen extensive use in conflict regions globally. Colloquially known as the ‘Right Arm of the Free World’, militaries both equipped with the FAL occasionally clashed with one another as well – as was the case with Argentina and the UK during the Falkland Islands conflict. While the British had restricted their L1 / FAL pattern rifles to semi automatic due to the generally uncontrollable nature of fully automatic fire with the 7.62 NATO cartridge, the Argentinian FALs remained capable of select fire – leading to persisting rumors of dubious authenticity about commonwealth troops ditching their Sterlings and L1s for captured, automatic Argentinian FALs. All of that to say this: While DSA had their full line of American-made FALs available to play with at the range, y’all know I had to give the original, enormous full-auto FAL a try! If it wasn’t obvious from the video, that first burst definitely catches me off guard. The recoil impulse on this piece of history is pretty gnarly, and it’s immediately obvious why the L1 series of rifles were restricted to semi automatic – that muzzle wants to climb skywards pretty hard! My second couple of trigger pulls are a bit more controlled, but all in all? HELL YEAH 😎 5. Faxon Full Auto .458 SOCOM AR Originating from frustration with 5.56 NATO’s stopping power against drugged-up combatants in the aftermath of the Gothic Serpent / Blackhawk Down incident, .458 SOCOM was an attempt to develop a harder-hitting cartridge that could be fired from an AR-type platform with minimal modification to the rifles themselves – namely an upper receiver swap. Despite the name, the cartridge never actually made much of an in-roads with the special operations community, and is essentially relegated to an interesting footnote and one helluva range toy. We were originally a tiny bit apprehensive about giving the SOCOM a go considering an overheard conversation regarding the gun’s charging handle – which had apparently started reciprocating along with the bolt due to the power of the cartridge. We’re not sure if that was actually occurring at some point or not, but by the time we got our hands on Faxon’s little monster here, it ran great! .458 is surprisingly not as overwhelming in full auto as one might initially expect – especially out of a barrel that short! Final verdict? HELL YEAH 😎 Parting Shots We were stoked to receive an invite to such a wild event, and although the weather was a little bit wild, we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves! Compared to a lot of other industry range days we’ve been to, we really enjoy the more niche and historical guns that show up at IV8888’s events – and appreciate the ability to geek the hell out on different styles of bakelite Vz.58 furniture with the dudes from Century Arms . If you’re a content creator of any kind within this community and you’ve got a potential in – take it! Who’d turn down an opportunity to play with suppressors and machine guns? Lastly, a huge shoutout to Ammoland for handling our video captures for us!

.300 Savage lever-action Review

.300 Savage lever-action Review

Shooting Lever Guns of the Old West Mike Venturino (Author) English (Publication Language) 300 Pages - 11/15/2010 (Publication Date) - Wolfe Pub Co (Publisher) Check Price Summary: The review considers the quality of craftsmanship, durability, ease of use and whether this item would be recommended. Overall rating Hunter’s review of the .300 Savage lever-action deer rifle For all-around use, the .300 Savage lever-action rifle is hard to beat. It has been and is used by both men and women, for close shots and distance shots, in open terrain and denser country. Though the .30-30 may be lighter and have a slightly shorter barrel for hunting in scrub, the .300 tends to be more versatile and accurate. This has been a very popular rifle for nearly a century and it is easy to see why. The lever action is short and clean, making it fast and easy to eject a spent casing and to re-chamber a new cartridge and the rifle is breech loading, so it tends to be faster shooting than most bolt action rifles, without sacrificing quality for quantity. The .300 was originally designed to replace the .303 and it did this admirably. The recoil isn’t as hard as with the .303, the trajectory for the .300 is flatter and the muzzle velocity tends to be higher, though not usually as high as with a .30-06. The most common loads for the .300 are 150 grain and 180 grain, with the velocity being 2630 fps and 2350 fps, respectively. This means that the bullet gets to its target in a hurry. Since this rifle ejects to the side, it is also quite easy to mount a scope, if desired, without forcing continual re-sighting for accuracy. Because of the flat trajectory, it functions well with open sights, particularly at closer ranges, so a scope isn’t at all necessary. The craftsmanship of the .300 Savage is excellent and gun cleaning is easy. It is definitely a quality rifle that was built to last. It has greater accuracy than many other comparable rifles and has well above average hitting power, capable of knocking a buck or a bull elk off it’s feet at a hundred yards. This rifle has few disadvantages, however there are a couple. For one thing, the stock tends to be fairly short except in special order versions. This makes it almost ideal for shorter people, but less suitable for those who have long arms, without using a butt pad or something to extend the length of the stock for a snug fit against the shoulder. The rifle can also be difficult to partly reload quickly, since the lever can’t be in a totally back position if there are already cartridges in the rifle. However, it does have a small mechanical counter to let a hunter know how many cartridges remain, so reloading can be planned and is more of an inconvenience than anything. On a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the best, I would have to give this rifle a rating of 4.5. Like most rifles, it does have a couple weak points, but this is a rifle I’ve always enjoyed shooting. You may also want to check out my monster guide to selecting the best gun safe.

Desert Eagle Pricing & Reference

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cc7c283f_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cc7c283f_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Are You in the Market for a Desert Eagle? Know what Desert Eagle firearms are worth with this up-to-date 6-page .PDF download from the 19th edition of Standard Catalog of Firearms. * Completely updated pricing for Desert Eagle firearms with new entries and photos * Value Trackers: Real-life auction results * Sleeper Alerts: Collectible guns that are outpacing the market * Links to manufacturers’ website Learn pricing and value for these Desert Eagle firearms: Desert Eagle .357 Magnum Desert Eagle .41 Magnum/.44 Magnum Desert Eagle .50 Action Express Desert Eagle Mark XIX "Desert Eagle Mark" XIX Component System Desert Eagle Baby Eagle Desert "Eagle Baby Eagle" .40 S&W (Standard) Desert Eagle Baby Eagle 9 mm (Standard) Desert Eagle Baby Eagle .41 Action Express Desert Eagle Baby Eagle Short Barrel (Semi-Compact) Desert Eagle Baby Eagle Short Barrel/Short Grip (Compact) Desert Eagle Baby Eagle Semi-Compact Polymer Desert Eagle Baby Eagle Compact Polymer Desert Eagle Mountain Eagle Desert "Eagle Mountain Eagle" Target Edition Desert Eagle Mountain Eagle Compact Edition Desert Eagle Lone Eagle Desert "Eagle Lone Eagle" (New Model) Desert Eagle Mountain Eagle Rifle Desert Eagle Mountain Eagle Varmint Edition Desert Eagle Magnum Lite Rimfire Rifle "Desert Eagle Magnum" Lite Centerfire Rifle Desert Eagle Tactical Rifle

Classy Double Guns

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d22ba396_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d22ba396_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } XE Grade Fox Double Shotgun XE Grade "Fox Double Shotgun" My late grandfather — the one who manned a tank in WWII — gunned Pennsylvania red- and gray-phase ruffed grouse with the same Fox Sterlingworth I now carry afield. This is how a double gun acquires history and meaning from one generation to the next (and what the anti-gun people don’t understand). Hunts add seasoned character to game-scene engraving and walnut stocks. Guys like us get warm and fuzzy feelings about such stuff. Double guns, put simply, are shotguns with two barrels. Side-by-sides (not to be confused with the four-wheeled types that take us places), and over/unders (nothing to do with Vegas sports betting, mind you) qualify. The classy part has everything to do with what editor Kevin Michalowski calls: “Expensive stuff . . . stuff that makes people say . . . hey, nice!” This wow factor rules. Some double guns win you over at first look and shoulder mount. The qualifier: Does it look good, feel sweet in your hands, and kill birds dead? That’s a classy double gun. Fox Double Guns As the story goes, President Theodore Roosevelt travelled to Africa in March 1909, shortly after leaving office. The A.H. Fox Company had presented him with an FE grade, 12-gauge double. In a letter to Mr. Fox following the gun’s arrival, Roosevelt described it as “the most beautiful gun I have ever seen.” No doubt functional too as he used it as part of the mammal-collecting safari for the Smithsonian Museum (160 species all told, observed and taken by the Colonel and his group of naturalist/collectors). Unlike Roosevelt, I have yet to wingshoot Africa. I doubt that my English setter Radar cares what I carry afield, especially when he’s all business and locked up on a ground-crouching woodcock in a painted New England cover, but I do. That timberdoodle, like others before it, often rises, planes out. Boom. Dead bird, we hope. My setter boy does seem to care a little when I miss, flashing me that glaring WTF look (ask your text-messaging kid to translate that acronym for you). I think my shooting improves dramatically if the shotgun looks and feels good in my hands. Truth is, I know it does. As mentioned at the start, my Fox Sterlingworth came to me through a family line of bird hunters — it killed a PA grouse on the first shot, fitting perfectly on my shooting shoulder. By fortune or circumstance, I also married into an A-grade Fox double. My wife’s great-grandfather, a.k.a “The Boss,” once appeared in an issue of Field & Stream back in the 1930s. Pictured there, a brace of Pennsylvania grouse held by the man himself, his nosed-minded English pointer nosing them, with The Boss, cooing “good dog” words as the photographer did his work. Absent: the Fox double, having done its job. Related GunDigest Articles Photo Gallery: 14 Amazing Engraved Guns of Gun Digest 2015 Photo Gallery: Engraved and Custom Guns of Gun Digest 2016 I can feel history when I hold it. A Fausti Classic 16-Gauge Double Gun A Fausti Classic 16-Gauge Double Gun After a lengthy hiatus, the Fox shotgun was reborn in the late 20th Century. In 1992 Connecticut Shotgun commenced to resurrecting the honorable line, building the Fox in a manner identical to original offerings. They feel, look and function the same way, since old  patents are faithfully followed. Serial numbers resumed from when Savage — who entered into an agreement with Connecticut Shotgun — discontinued the A.H. Fox line a handful of years after my paternal grandfather stopped driving that tank. Engraving patterns are also replicated. A quick history: Fox doubles originated back in 1905. In 1929, Savage Arms bought the company, dropping the line in 1948. Why? Hand labor cost was to blame. As with woodworking and even gardening, all classy doubles require copious amounts of TLC in the form of time and money. Pricey stuff. Fast forward to now. Picking up where Savage left off, the Connecticut Shotgun Manufacturing Company has continued to produce higher grades of the original A.H Fox line since that 1992 rebirth. Precision machining and operators, plus craftsmen who complete all polishing, rust bluing, engraving, stock checkering, and fitting, make the past present; as Connecticut Shotgun enthuses: “Today’s A.H. Fox guns are the same excellent value as those purchased by your grandfather.” Find them at: www.connecticutshotgun.com. AyA: Here to Stay A show of hands out there if you have: (1) Lovingly handled a buddy’s AyA double gun with envy as he looked on with parental pride, or (2) Own an AyA and have had “discussions” with your wife about it (indefinite pronoun translation: the price tag). Neither? You need to put something from the AyA line on your gun guy bucket list. AyA double guns have drop-dead-gorgeous eye appeal, timeworn word-of-mouth publicity, and earned character in the hands of hardcore wingshooters. Hey, if you were born in 1915 and still had all-day staying power in the 21st Century, we’d brag about you too. First things first: You say “A-Why-A” not “Eye-A”. Wouldn’t want you stumbling into an Orvis-endorsed wingshooting lodge invitation and have you get off on the wrong foot during conversation at the buffet table. That said, each AyA double — bearing the features of traditional English guns — is handmade. Built in AyA’s Eibar factory (the birthplace of Spain’s gunmaking industry) the birthing process is detailed.  Gunmakers smoke the steel. Parts are fitted. Metal is removed, one file stroke at a time. The forend, trigger guard, frame and barrels must marry with careful effort. Master stockers shape the walnut forend and stock. Engraving follows, and if you’re like me, it’s the first aspect that catches your eye. They’re works of art. Here’s the skinny on one of the more affordable, and easily the most famous and popular  sidelock AyA doubles out there, the No. 2:  Introduced in the late 1950s, the ubiquitous AyA No. 2 — straight-hand stocked with standard walnut and with simpler engraving than other more expensive options — is found in many a gun safes in the United States and around the world (“tens of thousands” have been sold since then, says the company). Let’s spec it out. The No. 2 Round Action is an easy-to-carry 6 ¾ pounds in 12-bore, while 16, 20, 28 and .410 options are also available. Barrels run 28 inches (other lengths can be ordered). Standard features in this side-by-side hammerless sidelock shotgun include the round-action frame of course, plus chopper-lump steel barrels, forged steel action with a double locking mechanism and gas vents, hardened steel intercepting safety sears, a double trigger with a hinged front trigger, and an optional selective or non-selective single trigger. Would added visual details close the deal?  English scroll engraving, with color hardened or old silver finish, and gold-lined cocking indicators — an automatic safety and concave rib as well —add up to one classy double.

Summary

Trigger control is one of the most important aspects of firearm control. In it’s simplest form, trigger control means keeping your finger off the trigger until you are ready to fire the firearm, one of the Three golden Rules of firearm safety. Just as important is the way one “presses” the trigger.